FREE, NO EGALITARIAN WEB

SOME REMARKS TO “WHAT WILL THE INTERNET LOOK LIKE IN 2040”

NET NEUTRALITY

 “We need to keep fighting for net neutrality,” Berners-Lee is cited in “What will the internet look like in 2040” (Chris Baraniuk, BBC, 15. October 2015) an interesting, multifaceted outlook on the evolution of the web. Net neutrality still seems to be a holy grail for some of those who defend the rights of everyone against a diversification leading to different layers, depending on costs and prices.  But does this mission really deliver what it promises? Is egalitarianism a helpful goal for the evolution of the internet? What are the consequences, a more “just” internet society with equal access to the web or will this society instead suffer a virtual entropic heat death?

PRIVACY AND INDIVIDUALITY

Again Berners-Lee: “I would like us to build a world in which I have control of my data, I own it ….” Indeed, ownership of data is not only a conceptual right but pivotal to the development of the individual in a virtual life. As a study of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania indicates, 70 percent of Americans are discontent with the social media trade sale: I give you my services for free in exchange you give me your private data to trade.

ANGST AND ANONYMITY ON THE INTERNET

Citation: “The Internet will help the rich get richer and become a tool to further marginalise people who are already living with poverty, mental illness, and other serious challengers.” wrote an anonymous director of operations for social network MetaFilter in the Pew report. The angst expressing view is not as irritating as the notion of the anonymous director, who obviously plays with the fears of people. Such doom-prediction can be or not, mostly it will not. But the new Internet needs personalities, characters, individuals to evolve, no faceless, nameless anonymities.

CONCLUSION

Baraniuk ends his article with a comprehensive, conciliatory view:  “In an open web then competition will not only drive the positive innovations people yearn for it could also allow for egalitarian values to persist.” In other words, the best solution is the freedom of decision. As long as egalitarian and non-egalitarian internet societies live side by side like once the Sapiens Sapiens and the Neanderthalians, evolution will happen in the framework and limits of a permissive society. No one is barred of the Internet, everyone can use it to his best abilities.


THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET IS UP TO THE USERS HOW THEY WANT TO LIVE
Who will win, the good or the bad (as long as there is no ugly surprisingly entering the stage)? The answer may be answered with the tale of the two wolves, allegedly a Cherokee story and for those who did not hear it before:
An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. “A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?” The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”